Film Review | Logan

Logan
4 / 5
IMDb Rating: 8.7
Starring: Hugh Jackman, Dafne Keen, Patrick Stewart, Boyd Holbrook, Stephen Merchant, Richard E. Grant, Elizabeth Rodriguez
Director: James Mangold
Plot Summary: In the near future, a weary Logan cares for an ailing Professor X in a hide out on the Mexican border. But Logan’s attempts to hide from the world and his legacy are up-ended when a young mutant arrives, being pursued by dark forces. (IMDb)

Billed as Hugh Jackman’s farewell to the iconic X-Men character Wolverine that he has become synonymous with over the past two decades, Logan is a gritty, bloody and fiery farewell that closes the door on Jackman’s incredible portrayal of Wolverine. 

The film begins with a haggard looking Logan, now a limousine driver and living in Mexico, having his hub caps stolen off him while he sleeps. He is awoken from a drunken slumber to massacre the would-be thieves and then return to an abandoned smelting plant in Mexico, where Professor Xavier is being looked after by Logan and albino mutant Caliban (Merchant) as Xavier is now suffering from a neurodegenerative disease which causes him to have seizures whereby he loses control of his famous telepathic powers to devastating effect. Logan himself is slowly being poisoned by the adamantium that is now slowing down his healing powers.

The villains of Logan are Transigen, a company that have tried to manufacture and weaponize their very own mutants to use as soldiers. However, as these children-mutants grew up it became clear they were becoming hard to control, and upon completion of another project which was intended to get rid of the ‘soul’ element of these creations, the children were to be killed as they were no longer necessary. Laura (Keen) is saved by Gabriela, an employee at Transigen at the time. She and Xavier both plead with Logan to save and escort Laura to Eden, a place where mutants would be safe from Transigen and their newly developed creations.

The acting performances across the board were all fantastic, in particularly Jackman as the equally weary and ferocious Wolverine, who had a Western-style aura about him whenever he squinted at and dealt with enemies. His mannerisms were suitably different to the previous films, as his powers are on the wane and his mentality about mutants and people in general are worse than ever. His tough love approach to inherently good characters is extended to Laura, who is played magnificently by Dafne Keen. Her action scenes were breathtaking as were the periods of silence in the car with Logan. I would very much like to see more X-Men films with Keen in them, as her character can fill the void of Wolverine going forward, as I am firmly of the belief that no actor should touch the Wolverine part for at least a decade due to Jackman’s loyalty, brilliance and sheer presence he has brought to the role that he has made iconic in the comic book and superhero universe.

Logan is a film full of blood and guts, but it has some heart with Logan-Wolverine’s developing sense of responsibility to Xavier and Laura as he gives everything in his final stand against villains who attempt to get rid of mutants. The film was almost like the passing of the guard from Logan to Laura. And I for one, would love to see Laura’s character develop and follow her storyline. 


The Humpo Show | Richard

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